Profile

Bechtel Family

The Bechtel family has a long and strong Scouting tradition. The Bechtel family runs the privately held Bechtel Corporation, a worldwide engineering, construction, and project management company. The international company is well known for completing major projects, such as the Hoover Dam and the Hong Kong International Airport.

Paul Siple

NATIONAL LODGE

ORDER OF THE ARROW

Presents

The Distinguished Service Award

To

PAUL A. SIPLE

Explorer, Geographer, Eagle Scout, Vigil Honor member of the Order of the Arrow, member of Alpha Phi Omega Scouting Fraternity, member of the National Committee on Camping and member of the National Court of Honor. Accompanied Admiral Richard Byrd on the first Antarctic Expedition, after selection as the outstanding Scout among 600,000 then enrolled. This being the first of many exploits and assignments as a civilian and commissioned officer in the United States Army. He was the first President of the American Polar Society, and more recently served as scientific leader of the United States participation in the Geophysical Year. Presently he is Director of the Army’s office of Polar Affairs. Through his achievements and personal life he has brought distinction to the organization with which he has affiliated and captured the imagination and admiration of youth throughout the land.

---- excerpted from a Paul A. Siple DSA Certificate awarded in 1958

George Feil & Son

The Feil family of Kansas City, Kansas served the Order of the Arrow for decades. The first member of the family to hold a leadership position was James R. (Jim) Feil. Jim, of Tamegonit Lodge. He was elected in 1953 to serve as National Conference Chief for the 1954 National Conference held in Laramie, Wyoming.

Ron Temple

Ronald J. Temple has been a lifelong educator and Scouter. An African American, he grew up in Chicago and worked at Camp Owasippe for several summers during the late 1950s-early 1960s. He earned the Explorer Silver Award as a youth and was an active Arrowman, receiving the Vigil Honor in 1960 with the name “The Seeker”.

Temple served as an area chief and had the fortunate opportunity to attend the 1960 National Planning Meeting. At that meeting Ron Temple was elected by his peers to serve as National Conference Chief for the 1961 National Order of the Arrow Conference (NOAC).

OA Abroad

For the first thirty years of the Order, all lodges chartered were from BSA councils within the United States. The first lodge not located in a state was in a US Territory. Nanuk Lodge from Alaska Council chartered on March 20, 1947. In 1947 a single council served Scouts throughout the entire Territory of Alaska.

Evolution of Sashes

In the early ceremonies and Wimachtendienk literature arrow sashes were called arrow bands. The original band is the black sash used in the 1915 ceremonies on Treasure Island. Harry Yoder describes it as a black band with a white vertical stripe on the front. George Chapman described presumably the same band as being black with a white vertical arrow on the front with the arrow pointing over the shoulder. This band is the first sash and none are known to exist. The material used to make the sash is often described as being the same material that was used in the making of the black academic type robes worn by Goodman and Edson for the first ceremony.

Elder Goodman

Goodman’s retirement in 1951 allowed him to spend more time with his wife Louise. They lived during the winter in the Penney Farms retirement community near Jacksonville, Florida and during the summer at a small farm in Bondville, Vermont, with both a house and a barn, which the Goodmans converted to living quarters with rooms for their children and grandchildren, named Brotherhood Barn.

Patch Trading

Nobody knows when the first swap of Order of the Arrow emblems took place, but it had to be soon after the first badges of Wimachtendienk appeared. In the early years there was no trading of OA insignia. The first insignia in 1916 were pins. Pins were made of silver or gold. They were relatively expensive, certainly when compared to patches. An Unami Lodge gold Second Degree pin in 1919 might have cost $2.00; the cost of 20 die-cut felt camp monogram patches. No one was trading them with each other.

Dwight Bischel - "Wab" Book

Dwight Bischel became a Scout in Chicago, Illinois and during the war years moved with his family to Bay City, Michigan. While in Bay City, Dwight earned his Eagle Scout with Silver Palm and was initiated into the Order of the Arrow. Dwight served as Lodge Chief of Gimogash Lodge, Summer Trails Council at Camp Haley for the summers of 1945 and 1946.

National Planning Meetings

The National Planning Meetings started in 1949. Through the years they have evolved, but the basics have remained the same. In general the purpose of the meeting is to bring the adult leadership of the Order of the Arrow, in the form of the National OA Committee and key volunteers together with the youth leadership of the OA in the form of an assembly of the Area/Section Chiefs.

The meetings have almost always been held during the week or weekend between Christmas and New Years. Together the adult leadership assists and guides the youth leadership as they layout plans for the coming year or two, select a theme for the conference or other national event / theme and create working committees. In particular, the National Planning Meetings make the plans necessary to stage the next NOAC. One of the other key features and the most anticipated portion of the meeting is the election of youth national officers.

Syndicate content