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Takodah Chapter of Owasippe

When Carroll A. Edson became a Field Executive in 1921 in Chicago Council it was only natural that he would bring Wimachtendienk with him. Chicago in 1921 had five geographic districts and a sixth “division” that was an overlay of the entire council. This division was the Douglas Division and it was for African American Scouts. No matter where in Chicago you lived, if you were Black then you were segregated into the Douglas Division.

Goodman - As Director of Program

By 1925 the BSA had outgrown its national and regional structure; each of more than 20 departments reported directly to Chief Scout Executive West. The national office reorganized in 1931, in four departments – Program, Operations, Personnel and Business.

OA Obligation Timeline

It is not known when the first WWW Obligation was used. Because it is part of the First Degree/Honor ritual it is believed that it likely was used in some form as early as 1916. The first known version of the Obligation dates to 1921. It read:

I, (your name), do hereby promise on my honor as a Scout, that I will always and faithfully preserve unbroken the secret rites, mysteries, signs and symbols of the Order of the WIMACHTENDIENK WINGOLAUCHSIK, WITAHEMUI, which I have now received or may be taught at any future time. I will always regard the bonds of brotherhood in this Order as sacred and binding, and will seek to preserve a cheerful spirit even in the midst of irksome tasks and weighty responsibilities, and will endeavor, so far as in my power lies, to be unselfish in service and devotion to the welfare of others. I will attend, so far as I am able, all regular and special meetings of the Order and do what I can to promote interest in them.

Goodman - Adult Family Life

Goodman matched his professional success during his years in Philadelphia with personal happiness. On June 18, 1920, he married Louise Wynkoop Waygood, a local girl whom he had first dated the same week in 1911 that he joined Troop 1. Louise and Urner had three children, Theodore Wynkoop, born August 12, 1921, George Walter, born February 26, 1923, and Lydia Ann, born April 21, 1927.

Membership Cards

Many organizations create a membership card as a way to show a person is a member in good standing (current on annual dues). The Wimachtendienk and later the Order of the Arrow was no different in this regard. In many cases the local lodge created their own card.

In 1923, at the third Meeting of the Grand Lodge the Extension and Registry Committee made the following recommendation to create the first nationally printed membership card:

Harvey A. Gordon

Harvey A. Gordon was one of the early pioneers of the Order. Like most of the other early leaders, Gordon was a Scout professional. He was the only Arrowman to ever receive the Distinguished Service Award (DSA) posthumously as one of the 11 inaugural DSA recipients.

Ceremony Booklets

The ceremonies of the Wimachtendienk and later the Order of the Arrow were written down and passed around so that there was similarity of the rituals in all Lodges. However, we do not have the earliest ceremony in any form.

The 1915 ritual that took place on each Friday night of camp at Treasure Island does not exist. There is even disagreement about the content of that ceremony among those who were there and witnessed it.

William Hinkle

William Hinkle was the gentle spirit of maturity and age among the enthusiasm and spirit of the young leaders of the emerging Wimachtendienk. He is a mystery person from the beginnings of the Wimachtendienk. He never emerges to the forefront, but his record of service and recognition places him in the same league with the founders and their key group of adult supporters.

Arthur Schuck

Arthur A. Schuck was one of several early pioneers of the Order of the Arrow who went on to have a long and distinguished professional Scouting career. Schuck entered Scouting in Newark, New Jersey as a Scoutmaster in 1913 at the age of 18. He became a professional Scouter in 1917 and subsequently became the Scout Executive for Reading Council, Reading, Pennsylvania. While in Reading, Schuck became acquainted with the Wimachtendienk and determined it would be a good fit in his council and their Camp Indiandale.

Non-OA Camp Fraternities

At one time the Order of the Arrow, or more appropriately Wimachtendienk W.W., was only one of numerous fraternal camp societies established all across the country at local Scout camps . During the earliest years of Scouting other fraternal programs developed such as Firecrafters, Ku-Ni-eh and Tribe of Gimogash. Like Wimachtendienk, these programs often spread from council to council and camp to camp becoming multi-council programs. Gimogash started by one time Kansas City and longtime Toledo Scout Executive J. St. Clair Mendenhall actually began in 1914, one year before Wimachtendienk. Gimogash for years existed in more local councils than the Order. However, Gimogash’s rule against having a national organization impeded their growth.

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