Goodman

50th Anniversary Gettysburg Reunion

When was the Order of the Arrow founded?  Where?

Consider that the answers to those two questions might not be as simple as, “Friday, July 16th 1915” and “Treasure Island.”

Goodman Biography Published

A Thing of the Spirit, The Life of E. Urner Goodman is the biography of the founder, written by Nelson R. Block and published by the Boy Scouts of America.

Treasure Island Closes 1913-2008

After 95 years Treasure Island Scout Reservation, the birthplace of our Order in 1915, ceased operation as a summer camp after the 2008 season. At the time of closing Treasure Island was the oldest continually operated Scout camp in the nation. Treasure Island fell victim to its location, an island in the middle of the Delaware River.

Goodman's 100th Birthday

Goodman’s centennial would have been May 15, 1991. To mark the occasion, the Journal of Scouting History published a biographical essay by Goodman’s friend and protégé, Bill Hillcourt. He wrote of their many years of mutual support and good times together.

He closed:

Urner was my friend, alive, for fifty years. He was, indeed, a GOOD MAN. He is a friend of mine until I die, and a friend of each of you who follow in his footsteps.

OA Time Capsule Sealed

At the 1990 NOAC during Founder’s Day, lodges and individuals could put items into a special 75th Anniversary time capsule. The capsule was filled with many pieces of Scouting memorabilia and other items of note from 1990.

National Chief John Meckley and National Vice Chief Tony Steinhardt sealed the capsule in a special ceremony. The capsule is to be opened on the 100th Anniversary of the Order in 2015.

Film Features Goodman

The Closing show at the 1983 NOAC premiered the inspirational film See the Need, a short subject film on the life of E. Urner Goodman. The film contained excerpts from speeches by the founder and scenes of him with Arrowmen. The film was five years in the making and featured the song Meet the Challenge, written and performed by Sam Fairchild. All proceeds from the sale of the film went to the OA Endowment fund.

Goodman

Infinity, dear brothers, extends not only outward to the reaches of that clear blue sky… but also inward, to the heart of each human being. E. Urner Goodman 1975 NOAC closing address.


Goodman lived in an era of great change – from horse and buggy days to men on the moon. He also lived a life of great change. He knew much joy – a good childhood with friends and family, a successful career, a loving wife, three wonderful children and the lifelong inspiration of his faith. He also knew much tragedy – the death of his mother and aunt when he was a little boy, months of quarantine for diphtheria, tuberculosis as a young man, and the death of his son George in World War II.

Goodman Memorial Service

In the late winter of 1980, while visiting his children in New Jersey, Goodman caught a cold, which turned into pneumonia. He went to Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan, where he could have specialists treat him, but he remained in intensive care. He passed away on March 13Portrait of Goodman.

Goodman, Post Professional

In 1951, after 36 years as a professional Scouter and having reached age 60, Goodman retired from the BSA. Never one to stay idle, he immediately took up the leadership of the newly formed United Church Men of the National Council of Churches in Christ.

Syndicate content