Hartman

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1983 DSA Recipients

The Distinguished Service Award (DSA) is presented to those Arrowmen who have rendered distinguished and outstanding service to the Order on a sectional, regional, or national basis. The following were presented the DSA at the 1983 National Order of the Arrow Conference - Richard M. Aberle, Kenneth G. Ackermann, Robert S. Akes, Mark S. Anderson, Dale J. Apley Jr., Frank R. Berger, Kurt E. Christiansen, Alan B. Cooper, Phillip Shaw "Ted" Costin, M. Gene Cruse, Steven C. Davidek, Thomas R. Deimler, Dennis G. Downing, Richard O. Eberly, Donald L. Fifield, Kenneth J. Grimes, Clifford J.

Ray Petit

Raymond C. Petit was born December 31, 1943 and inducted into the Order of the Arrow in March 1959 in a ceremony that was read from the books and with a neighbor boy who shot at the “Indians.” One year later, Ray organized a team and that year’s new candidates participated in the first Ordeal Ceremony in Ump Quah lodge performed entirely from memory. In the fall of 1961, Ray was elected vice chief of the lodge and continued his emphasis on high quality ceremonies as well as the experience of the Ordeal itself.

John Forrest

John (Jock) Forrest was inducted as an Ordeal Member into Chappegat Lodge (now Ktemaque) near New Rochelle, New York in 1952, earned his Brotherhood in1953, and was recognized with the Vigil Honor in 1960.

Jock was a member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) Alpha Phi Omega (APO) chapter where, after earning a Master’s of Science degree in Political Science, he was deeply impressed with the work of a younger member, Ray Petit. The two became life-long friends and as highly energetic organizer and manager, Jock shared much of Ray’s work with a larger audience. Jock served as an early contributor to many Scouting Service Exchange (SEE) projects including the Election Ceremony and procedures revisions, and the editing and development of the Handbook for Ceremonial Teams, and other projects.

Ceremonial Advisory Group Formed

Other authors revised the early ceremonies in the late 1940s just prior to the Order of the Arrow becoming an official program of the Boy Scouts of America. By the 1950s and early 1960s however, the OA initiation had, to a large degree nationally, deteriorated into a haphazardly conducted formality, all too frequently characterized by hazing and other activities inconsistent with not only the Order’s principles, but also the core tenants of the Scout Oath and Law.

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