West

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Chief Scout Executive Becomes OA Member

In the summer of 1938 Chief Scout Executive James E. West was inducted into the Order of the Arrow at Camp Siwanoy, Chappegat Lodge, New Rochelle, New York. West allowed the Order to grow on its own merits at the 1922 Scout Executive conference when a resolution was entertained to disapprove of camp fraternities.

OA Becomes Official Scout Program

In 1933, the National Council (BSA) after methodical analysis concluded that programs like the OA could enhance Scouting. The OA had been assured that they would become an official Scout program.

Still to be sorted out were issues concerning the structure between the OA and BSA, methods of handling the Vigil Degree, issues regarding Arrowmen that no longer were registered as Scouts and adjustments desired by religious groups.

OA Becomes Official Experiment

 For the first 17 years of its existence, the Order had operated autonomously. While made up exclusively of Scouts the Order did not report to the national office. The one nod to the BSA authority was the Scout Executive, the Supreme Chief of the Fire, who possessed the authority to terminate the lodge.

WWW Threatened with Extinction

In 1922 the BSA was 12 years old. It was still a young organization. To improve the Scout program and to train the professional corps, the BSA held Biennial National Meetings of Scout executives. In September 1922 the Scout executives gathered at the Blue Ridge Assembly near Asheville, North Carolina.

James E. West Chief Executive

On January 1, 1911, James E. West begins his tenure as the first executive secretary of the Boy Scouts of America and opens a new office in New York City on January 1, 1911.  The position would be renamed Chief Scout Executive, a position occupied by West until 1943.

James E. West Chief Scout Executive

James Edward West, born May 16, 1876, never knew his father. His mother died when Jimmy was six. He spent most of his youth in a Washington, D.C. orphanage, except for two years starting at age eight when he was in a hospital being treated for tuberculosis, which left one leg crippled, often strapped on his back.

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