Indian

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/history/public_html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

OA Logo Changes

The change in the OA logo was made official by the National OA Committee as part of their adoption of the 1998 Strategic Plan. In discussing actions taken to achieve the vision spelled out in the plan, it states:

We will adopt a new logo; one focused on the Arrow rather than the Indian. The Arrow is easily the most recognizable symbol that has its origin in our first ceremony. By taking the Arrowhead from the Arrow on the sash as our logo, we unify our image and strengthen the identity embodied in our name, the Order of the Arrow. 

1997 National Jamboree

The 1997 National Scout Jamboree was held at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, from July 28 to August 6 with the theme “Character Counts . . . Be prepared for the 21st Century”. 36,015 Scouts participated in the Jamboree.

1997 marked another year for expansion for the OA at the Jamboree. The OA conducted four programs at the jamboree: OA Service Corps, The Outdoor Adventure Place (or TOAP), the OA Indian Village, and a new idea “Odyssey of the Law” program in addition to continuing to provide leadership service for the Youth Services Subcamp.

National Pow Wow

The 1987 National Pow Wow conducted at Northwest Community College in Powell, Wyoming from August 2-8. It was a great success and the knowledge gained and enthusiasm generated was felt in the lodges for a long time. Nearly 500 Arrowmen gathered for the first National Pow Wow that offered outstanding workshop seminars in three separate areas of interest: OA Showmanship, Indian Lore, and Ceremonies. As he was with the National Indian Seminar series, National OA Committee member Don Thom was the driving force behind this event. 

Campership Fund Created

The Maury Clancy Indian Campership Fund was created in 1971 to assist with funds to those American Indian Boy Scouts who wanted to attend resident camp. This fund was subsequently named in memory of long-time National OA Committee member, Maury Clancy. Mr. Clancy contributed significantly to the Order by emphasizing the significance of our nation's American Indian culture and he worked to encourage the preservation of our American Indian heritage.

Syndicate content