OA

Onward Arrowman Plan

Mindful of our High Tradition we, as Arrowmen assembled for our Golden Anniversary National Conference, hereby resolve to dedicate ourselves, our lodges, our areas, and national organization to the following quests in cheerful service:

The above was the preamble to the Onward Arrowman Plan announced at the 1965 NOAC. The plan was divided into four quests, the first letter in each quest spelling the word “PLAN”.

John Forrest

John (Jock) Forrest was inducted as an Ordeal Member into Chappegat Lodge (now Ktemaque) near New Rochelle, New York in 1952, earned his Brotherhood in1953, and was recognized with the Vigil Honor in 1960.

Jock was a member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) Alpha Phi Omega (APO) chapter where, after earning a Master’s of Science degree in Political Science, he was deeply impressed with the work of a younger member, Ray Petit. The two became life-long friends and as highly energetic organizer and manager, Jock shared much of Ray’s work with a larger audience. Jock served as an early contributor to many Scouting Service Exchange (SEE) projects including the Election Ceremony and procedures revisions, and the editing and development of the Handbook for Ceremonial Teams, and other projects.

1966 National Planning Meeting

The year-end 1966 National Planning Meeting was held at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, the site scheduled for the 1967 NOAC. Robert F. Szczys from Chatoka Lodge, Bottineau, North Dakota was elected National Conference Chief and Mark Samios from Shingis Lodge, McKeesport, Pennsylvania was elected National Conference Vice Chief. The Deputy Conference Chiefs selected were Paul A. Leonardi, Roger D. Maine, Gary Tomlinson, David W. Tharp, Charles Marr, David Boone, Stephen E. Lickey and Michael J. Moseman.

1969 National Jamboree

The 1969 National Jamboree was held at Farragut State Park, Idaho, from July 16 to 22 with the theme “Building to Serve”. Astronaut and Eagle Scout Neil A. Armstrong sent the 34,251 Scouts greetings from outer space during his historic voyage to the moon.

NOAC 1969

The OA returned back to Indiana University for a sixth time to hold the 54th Anniversary National Conference (what we now call a NOAC). While the term “Conference” had replaced “Meeting” for a number of years, the 1969 Conference patch was the first to actually say “Conference” on it. The Conference theme chosen by the National Planning Committee was “Pathways to Service”. A record 4,421 Arrowmen attended the Conference. The national meetings were still growing in size.

First OA Jacket Patch Issued

Prior to 1967 the Order of the Arrow did not have a jacket patch. In fact, they really did not have a logo. They had of course used American Indian themes, but there was no standardized design. That all changed with the introduction of the first jacket patch featuring a multicolored American Indian chieftain. The design had been introduced circa 1961 and was used extensively starting at the 1961 NOAC.  The design is attributed to Martin Mockford.  The jacket patch was an immediate hit and became iconic in Scouting.

1967 World Jamboree in USA

The 1967 XII World Jamboree was hosted by the Boy Scouts of America and was held at Farragut State Park, Idaho, from August 1 to 9, the 60th anniversary of Baden-Powell’s experimental Boy Scout Camp on Brownsea Island.

A total of 12,011 Scouts participated in the Jamboree representing 105 countries. The BSA host country allotment was limited to 4,282 Scouts.1967 Lodge 311 host flap

NOAC 1967

Building on the great success of the 1965 NOAC, 4,148 delegates traveled to the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Over 400 different lodges had a contingent. The Conference theme "With Hearts and Wills United" also built on the 1965 theme. They both came from the same stanza of the Ordeal ceremony:

We who bear the obligation

Of the Order of the Arrow

Mindful of our high tradition

Ponder that which is our purpose

Pledge ourselves to cheerful service

With the guidance of our Maker

We with hearts and wills united

Pledge to serve His holy purpose.

1967 DSA Recipients

The Distinguished Service Award (DSA) is presented to those Arrowmen who have rendered distinguished and outstanding service to the Order on a sectional, regional, or national basis. The following were presented the DSA at the 1967 National Order of the Arrow Conference - Alma D. Banks, Harold W. "Hal" Cairney, William R. Clary, Judson "Jud" Compton, Michael S. Costello, Roger J. Frey, John R. Miltner, Bruce A. Moore, Walter W. Nappa, James J. Petro, Robert H. Schley, William E. Slesnick, Harris M. Tanner, Gary A. Waldorf and Arthur B.

Red Arrow Award

The Red Arrow award was created in 1967 to recognize individuals who are not members of the Order of the Arrow, for outstanding service to the Order. In many ways this award is the OA’s equivalent award to the Distinguished Service Award (DSA) for Arrowmen, except it is the award for non-OA members only. This attractive award has varied in design over the years. The award currently is a red arrow and medallion superimposed on an engraved plaque. A miniature charm for civilian wear is also available. The Red Arrow Award can only be awarded by action of the National Order of the Arrow Committee. Recommendations by nomination form are sent to the National OA Director.

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