OA

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Ceremonial Advisory Group Formed

Other authors revised the early ceremonies in the late 1940s just prior to the Order of the Arrow becoming an official program of the Boy Scouts of America. By the 1950s and early 1960s however, the OA initiation had, to a large degree nationally, deteriorated into a haphazardly conducted formality, all too frequently characterized by hazing and other activities inconsistent with not only the Order’s principles, but also the core tenants of the Scout Oath and Law.

1968 National Planning Meeting

The National Planning Meeting returned to Indiana University at the end of 1968 to plan the 1969 NOAC. Thomas E. Fielder of White Feather Lodge, Paducah, Kentucky was elected National Conference Chief. Later that year, his home lodge would make a special flap patch commemorating Chief Fielder, the beginning of a tradition that exists to this day. Philip Chabot, Nentego Lodge, Bel Air, Maryland was elected Conference Vice Chief.

Jim Lovell

Jim Lovell is best known as the Commander of the Apollo 13 mission. He was also an Arrowman. Lovell was an Eagle Scout serving in Milwaukee County Council and in 1946 served as lodge treasurer of Mikano Lodge.

Lovell piloted the Gemini 7 space flight in December of 1965 and Gemini 12 in November of 1966. As Goodman put it,

we shot an Arrowman in the air.

The OA in Space

On January 28, 1969 Donald Pountain, the lodge chief of Mikano Lodge, Milwaukee, Wisconsin received an astounding letter from a former lodge officer. Captain James “Jim” Lovell, former Lodge Secretary for Mikano Lodge had enclosed a Mikano Lodge flap that had joined Lovell on his Apollo 8 voyage that went around the moon and back. Lovell stated that he would have liked to have actually worn the patch on his spacesuit, however after the Apollo 1 tragedy, nothing could be worn on the suit that was not fireproof.

An Arrowman's Profile - Desegregation of OA

Dr. David Briscoe grew up in Mars Hill, North Carolina, a small agrarian community 18 miles north of Asheville. He joined the Boy Scouts in 1965, earned Eagle Scout in 1968, and became a member of Tsali Lodge 134 in 1968. He was the first African American inductee and Vigil Honor member in that lodge which had existed for thirty years, at a time where segregation still dominated the South. He received Brotherhood in 1969, and the Vigil Honor in 1973. What follows is Dr. Briscoe’s Scout story as told in own words.

Fifth National OA Secretary

In the fall of 1968 Martin Mockford stepped down from the position of National Secretary of the Order of the Arrow. Mockford had served for nearly 10 years in the position, longer than any previous secretary. Mockford was moving on to become Deputy Regional Scout Executive in Dallas, Texas.

National Standard Lodge Created

In 1957 the lodge re-charter process and forms were changed from an information device to a “policy compliance” agreement.

Questions regarding ceremonies, membership, administration, rules, adults, and funds were incorporated, requiring a “yes” or “no” answer, thus establishing the first “standards” for lodges. In 1960, a total of 16 questions were developed as part of a lodge training effort. These questions were listed for “appraising the operation of an Order of the Arrow lodge” and became the first formal set of standards provided to lodges.

Onward Arrowman Plan II

Based on the success of the Onward Arrowmen Plan implemented in 1965, an Onward Arrowmen Plan II was announced at the 1967 National Conference. It included a two-year focus by the Order in four main areas: a Personal Challenge, a Lodge Challenge, an Area Conference Challenge and a National Challenge.

As presented in the winter 1968 national bulletin, it read as follows:

   ONWARD ARROWMEN PLAN II

   With hearts and wills united, let us strive to meet these challenges:

Red Arrow Award

The Red Arrow award was created in 1967 to recognize individuals who are not members of the Order of the Arrow, for outstanding service to the Order. In many ways this award is the OA’s equivalent award to the Distinguished Service Award (DSA) for Arrowmen, except it is the award for non-OA members only. This attractive award has varied in design over the years. The award currently is a red arrow and medallion superimposed on an engraved plaque. A miniature charm for civilian wear is also available. The Red Arrow Award can only be awarded by action of the National Order of the Arrow Committee. Recommendations by nomination form are sent to the National OA Director.

1967 DSA Recipients

The Distinguished Service Award (DSA) is presented to those Arrowmen who have rendered distinguished and outstanding service to the Order on a sectional, regional, or national basis. The following were presented the DSA at the 1967 National Order of the Arrow Conference - Alma D. Banks, Harold W. "Hal" Cairney, William R. Clary, Judson "Jud" Compton, Michael S. Costello, Roger J. Frey, John R. Miltner, Bruce A. Moore, Walter W. Nappa, James J. Petro, Robert H. Schley, William E. Slesnick, Harris M. Tanner, Gary A. Waldorf and Arthur B.

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