treasure Island

Treasure Island Mural

Treasure Island Mural, 1936

Painted by Edward Spicer

 

The mural, Treasure Island is a painting of a map of the island by artist Edward Spicer.  It is a cornerstone to OA Art History.

The 12 foot-wide, seven-foot tall panel mural was dedicated to the Order at the 1936 National Lodge Meeting hosted by Unami Lodge on Treasure Island. The painting depicts an aerial outline of the island surrounded by the Delaware River. Various areas of camp, including the Unami Ceremonial Grounds , are suggested by indian figures indicating the history of Leni Lenape living on Island.

Treasure Island Closes 1913-2008

After 95 years Treasure Island Scout Reservation, the birthplace of our Order in 1915, ceased operation as a summer camp after the 2008 season. At the time of closing Treasure Island was the oldest continually operated Scout camp in the nation. Treasure Island fell victim to its location, an island in the middle of the Delaware River.

50th Anniversary Dedication

On the weekend of June 11-13, 1965 Unami Lodge hosted an Area 3A conference at Treasure Island. Part of the area conference program was the dedication of a plaque commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Order. Four hundred Arrowmen were on hand along with the Founders, E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson,  the Order’s first chief George Chapman and the Order's first Guide and Guardian of the Trail, Harry Yoder. The Plaque reads:

First "National" Lodge Meeting

The OA gathered together again for a national meeting hosted for a fourth time by Unami Lodge at Treasure Island. The convention had originally been scheduled for 1935, as meetings were biannual. However, the workload created by the planned 1935 National Jamboree impacted the national officers and many leaders of the local lodges. It was decided to delay the meeting for a year. This pattern has been repeated in later years, the Order giving deference to the National Jamboree, even if it meant a three-year gap between NOAC’s instead of two.


The 1936 meeting was one of change. It no longer was a “Grand” Lodge Meeting. This was a “National” Lodge Meeting. The change in name a simple reminder of the change in the Order, now part of the BSA. The change in the program, however, was striking.

Goodman - Adult Family Life

Goodman matched his professional success during his years in Philadelphia with personal happiness. On June 18, 1920, he married Louise Wynkoop Waygood, a local girl whom he had first dated the same week in 1911 that he joined Troop 1. Louise and Urner had three children, Theodore Wynkoop, born August 12, 1921, George Walter, born February 26, 1923, and Lydia Ann, born April 21, 1927.

First Vigil Honor Ceremony

At end of the camping season in 1915, E. Urner Goodman held a vigil on the Devil's Tea Table. There was no real ritual ceremony that accompanied his experience, just Goodman alone with his thoughts through a night that he often referred to as life changing for him.

First Vigil

The founders had intended that the first Vigil Honor should be for a youth who achieved an outstanding accomplishment or performed a heroic deed. At the close of 1915 Treasure Island summer camp season a small group including Carroll Edson, Harry Yoder and non-member Horace Kern decided that Goodman should be selected for what in 1916 would be called the Second Degree and today is recognized as the first Vigil Honor.

Goodman Influenced - Story of Billy Clark

When the Treasure Island staff planned the first induction, Urner Goodman had one Scout in mind as the model of cheerful service he wanted for its members - Billy Clark.  Billy was a member of Philadelphia's Troop 1, led by Scoutmaster Goodman and is listed in their records as an “Assistant Scribe.” Years later Goodman described a troop campout at Treasure Island.

One time during our stay there, one of our charges came with a minor sickness. There was no medicine, no hospital on the island at all. So he had to stay in his tent and he had to be taken care of. Billy volunteered to be our live-in nurse for the two or three days he had to be there. And he did a good job of it.

Goodman & Edson Camp Directors

In April of 1915, E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson both were hired by Philadelphia Council and entered Professional Scouting at the age of 23. Philadelphia Scout Executive Walter S. Cowing appointed them both as  Field Commissioners (now called Field Executives). The following month the Philadelphia Council Camp Committee appointed Goodman as Camp Director at Treasure Island Scout Reservation and Edson as his Assistant Camp Director in charge of commissary.

Treasure Island

Treasure Island Scout Camp (also known as Treasure Island Scout Reservation) opened as a Philadelphia Council summer camp in 1913. The name Treasure Island had come from the popular Robert Louis Stevenson pirate novel of the same name published in 1883. Philadelphia used the pirate motif on some of their early promotional material. Treasure Island would become the longest continuously run Scout camp in the BSA and most notably, the birthplace of the Order of the Arrow.

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