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Fifth Grand Lodge Meeting

For the Fifth Grand Lodge Meeting and 10th Anniversary of Wimachtendienk, W.W. the Grand Lodge returned to Philadelphia and Treasure Island with Unami Lodge the host. 27 delegates from nine lodges attended the assembly. At the meeting it was determined that certain changes had to be made in ceremonies to satisfy religious organizations. Also a full update of the constitution was passed. The greatest change was in nomenclature. First, Second and Third Degrees would now also be called "Ordeal", "Brotherhood" and "Vigil".

Sixth Grand Lodge Meeting

The 1926 Sixth Meeting of the Grand Lodge was the second held at Camp Indiandale. Minsi Lodge of Reading, Pennsylvania hosted the eight lodges in attendance. The number of delegates is not known. This meeting was a working meeting where committee reports were reviewed and changes were made in the by-laws and rituals. The most substantive change to the By-laws was a decision to hold the Grand Lodge Meetings every other year starting in 1927. A committee was charged with exploring the concept of setting up regions and sections to hold meetings in non Grand Lodge meeting years. 

Lodges are Numbered

Prior to 1926, listings of lodges kept by the Grand Lodge were typically alphabetical or loosely related to the order that the lodges originally applied for charter. In 1926 the decision was made to give each lodge a unique number. Because these numbers were applied retroactively, errors did occur. For example, even though Pamrapaugh Lodge of Bayonne, New Jersey was one of the original eleven charter lodges present for the 1921 Grand Lodge Meeting, they were given the number 14. In its place, Wawonaissa Lodge of Fanwood, New Jersey was erroneously given the number ten.

First Approval for Patches

Up until 1926, pins were the only insignia approved for use by Arrowmen. This had been the rule in both the first Constitution of Wimachtendienk in 1916 and the constitution framed at the 1921 Grand Lodge Meeting. When the Order expanded to a dozen lodges at least two of them desired patches as insignia.

Arthur Schuck

Arthur A. Schuck was one of several early pioneers of the Order of the Arrow who went on to have a long and distinguished professional Scouting career. Schuck entered Scouting in Newark, New Jersey as a Scoutmaster in 1913 at the age of 18. He became a professional Scouter in 1917 and subsequently became the Scout Executive for Reading Council, Reading, Pennsylvania. While in Reading, Schuck became acquainted with the Wimachtendienk and determined it would be a good fit in his council and their Camp Indiandale.

Constitution for WWW

One of the primary purposes of the first meeting of the Grand Lodge in 1921 was to frame and ratify the first WWW national constitution.

First Grand Lodge Officers

The first elections for officers of the Grand Lodge were held at the first Grand Lodge Meeting pursuant to the newly ratified constitution. There were three offices: The Grand Chieftain (Eluwak Kittakima), The Grand Scribe (Eluwak Lekhiket) and The Grand Treasurer (Eluwak Mawachpo).

First Modern Vigil Honor Ceremony

According to Edson, he recalled returning to Treasure Island at the end of camp in 1916 where he and Goodman wrote the ritual for the Second Degree (then equivalent to Vigil Honor). Edson further recalled that Goodman was put through that ritual. It is presumed that this is the ceremony that Edson experienced when he kept his vigil.

There is no known copy of this ritual. Presumably the Second Degree ceremony was evolving just like both parts of the First Degree ceremonies were evolving.

Non-OA Camp Fraternities

At one time the Order of the Arrow, or more appropriately Wimachtendienk W.W., was only one of numerous fraternal camp societies established all across the country at local Scout camps . During the earliest years of Scouting other fraternal programs developed such as Firecrafters, Ku-Ni-eh and Tribe of Gimogash. Like Wimachtendienk, these programs often spread from council to council and camp to camp becoming multi-council programs. Gimogash started by one time Kansas City and longtime Toledo Scout Executive J. St. Clair Mendenhall actually began in 1914, one year before Wimachtendienk. Gimogash for years existed in more local councils than the Order. However, Gimogash’s rule against having a national organization impeded their growth.

Second Grand Lodge Meeting

Minsi Lodge in Reading, Pennsylvania on October 6 and 7th, 1922 hosted the second meeting of the Grand Lodge. There were seven lodges in attendance and 14 delegates. While the early Grand Lodge and National Lodge meetings were the precursors of today’s modern National Conferences, in the early years they much were more similar to a lodge or section executive meeting. They were business meetings, made up largely of Scout professionals and were not immune to politics.

The Second meeting of the Grand Lodge was at times contentious and political. At stake was determination of who would lead the Order as the second Grand Chieftain. There were two distinguished candidates.

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