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Maury Clancy

Maurice M. “Maury” Clancy, from Santa Fe, New Mexico and later served Ashie Lodge, San Diego, California, was a member of the National OA Committee. He was most known for his work as an Indian specialist. Maury emphasized the significance of our nation's American Indian culture and worked to encourage the preservation of our American Indian heritage. He received the Orders Distinguished Service Award in 1971 and died December 16, 1974.

Campership Fund Created

The Maury Clancy Indian Campership Fund was created in 1971 to assist with funds to those American Indian Boy Scouts who wanted to attend resident camp. This fund was subsequently named in memory of long-time National OA Committee member, Maury Clancy. Mr. Clancy contributed significantly to the Order by emphasizing the significance of our nation's American Indian culture and he worked to encourage the preservation of our American Indian heritage.

Jay Dunbar

Jay Dunbar is the author of the current pre-Ordeal Ceremony. Realizing that the four ceremonial officials are equally necessary to form a circle, he coined the term “principals” and gave each an equal part, basing the text on the 1948 revision and adding the Investing. He is the creator of The Brotherhood Hike, and the author (as Tischitanissohen, his Vigil Honor name) of The Drum: a training aid for ceremonial teams. With Ray Petit, he co-authored the original Eleven Cardinal Principles of the Induction (now the Ten Induction Principles), and the Spirit of the Arrow Show, which introduced Spirit of the Arrow to the nation at the 1971 NOAC.

E. Urner Goodman Camping Award Created

At the 1968 National Planning Meeting, a proposal was made to create a camping award to encourage camp promotion. The plan was approved and it was introduced at the 1969 National Conference as the E. Urner Goodman Camping Award.

Ceremonial Advisory Group Formed

Other authors revised the early ceremonies in the late 1940s just prior to the Order of the Arrow becoming an official program of the Boy Scouts of America. By the 1950s and early 1960s however, the OA initiation had, to a large degree nationally, deteriorated into a haphazardly conducted formality, all too frequently characterized by hazing and other activities inconsistent with not only the Order’s principles, but also the core tenants of the Scout Oath and Law.

The OA in Space

On January 28, 1969 Donald Pountain, the lodge chief of Mikano Lodge, Milwaukee, Wisconsin received an astounding letter from a former lodge officer. Captain James “Jim” Lovell, former Lodge Secretary for Mikano Lodge had enclosed a Mikano Lodge flap that had joined Lovell on his Apollo 8 voyage that went around the moon and back. Lovell stated that he would have liked to have actually worn the patch on his spacesuit, however after the Apollo 1 tragedy, nothing could be worn on the suit that was not fireproof.

Nixon Elected President

Our 37th President was a former Vice President, Lawyer, U.S. Representative, and Naval Officer (Lieutenant Commander) in World War II. He was re-elected in 1972 in one of the largest landslide victories in U.S. history, but the Watergate Scandal marred his second term and Nixon became the only President to be forced to resign from office in disgrace or face certain impeachment and expulsion.

National Standard Lodge Created

In 1957 the lodge re-charter process and forms were changed from an information device to a “policy compliance” agreement.

Questions regarding ceremonies, membership, administration, rules, adults, and funds were incorporated, requiring a “yes” or “no” answer, thus establishing the first “standards” for lodges. In 1960, a total of 16 questions were developed as part of a lodge training effort. These questions were listed for “appraising the operation of an Order of the Arrow lodge” and became the first formal set of standards provided to lodges.

"Super Bowl I"

The first “Super Bowl” was played on January 15, 1967 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. At the time it was called the AFL-NFL Championship Game and was largely seen as an exhibition game at the time. The game was carried on two networks, CBS and NBC, however the game was blacked-out in the Los Angeles area because the game could not draw enough fans to be sold out. The Vince Lombardi-coached Green Bay Packers of the NFL were led by Hall of Fame quarterback Bart Starr as they defeated the AFL’s Kansas City Chiefs 35 to 10.

Eagle Scout First on the Moon

Neil Armstrong (August 5, 1930 – August 25, 2012), the first man on the moon earned his Eagle Scout award in Wapakoneta, Ohio’s Troop 14 in 1947 just prior to entering Purdue University later that same year to begin his study of Aerospace engineering.

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