2

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/history/public_html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Brotherhood Requirements Change

On October 9, 1950, a letter was sent to each lodge chief and lodge adviser through the local Scout Executive. The letter detailed changes in the Order of the Arrow Ceremonials – both Ordeal and Brotherhood. The changes sent were effective immediately and were to be written into the existing ceremonial pamphlets until the changes could be put into the next printing. The National Committee, Order of the Arrow, Norman C. Wood, Secretary signed the letter.

Korean War Armistice

The Korean War (1950 – armistice, 1953) was a military conflict . . .

First to Reach Mt. Everest Summit

After years of dreaming about it and seven weeks of climbing, New Zealander Edmund Hillary and his Sherpa guide Nepalese Tenzing Norgay became the first men to reach the summit of Mt. Everest in the Himalayas, along the border of Nepal and Tibet/China, the highest mountain in the world, at 11:30 a.m. on May 29, 1953.

Goodman Retires

After 36 years of service for the Boy Scouts of America, E Urner Goodman retired as a professional Scouter. He had served as Director of Program for twenty years. Goodman’s professional career had started in 1915 when as a 23 year old he was hired by the Philadelphia Council to be a Field Commissioner (now known as Field Executive). He served as Camp Director at Treasure Island Scout Reservation where he started the Order.

Goodman Honorary National Chief

On September 13, 1951 the National OA Committee voted to bestow the title of “Honorary National Chief” on Dr. E. Urner Goodman. Thirty years earlier Goodman had served Wimachtendienk, W.W. as its first Grand Lodge Chieftain, later called National Chief. This honor was made in tribute to the Founder upon his retirement from the BSA.

NOAC 1952

The 1952 NOAC was called the “37th Anniversary Meeting”. For the first time the term Conference is used often to describe the event. The first documented usage of the phrase “National Order of the Arrow Conference” is in a letter following the event written to the National OA Committee by LeRoy Kensrad of Hyas Chuck Kah Sun Klatawa Lodge, Portland, Oregon.

Eisenhower Elected President

Brilliant military five-star General and 34th President of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower (“Ike”) is probably best known for his internationally focused politics in response to events involving the Soviet Union and China.

First OA National Secretary

As soon as the OA was integrated into the BSA Wes Klusmann, BSA Director of Camping, needed to select the first National Secretary. This was not a high level assignment although it would be at BSA national headquarters. This job would have a huge clerical component. The National Secretary would be responsible for, among other duties, local lodge charter renewals, theNational Bulletin, maintaining Vigil Honor lists and coordinating supplies for local lodges.

First National OA Committee Chair

G. Kellock “Kel” Hale was installed as the first Chairman of the National Order of the Arrow Committee at the 1948 National Conference at Bloomington, Indiana. The National Council, BSA, had not technically approved his position yet, but that was just a formality. The selection of Hale according to outgoing National Chief Robert Heistand was because Kel was next in line to be National Chief. The new National Chairman position was considered the post-BSA integration equivalent to the old National Chief.

G. Kellock Hale, Jr.

G. Kellock “Kel” Hale was born January 17, 1904 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He joined Scouts at the age of 12 (minimum age in those days) in 1916. During World War I, Kel sold more war bonds than any other Scout in Philadelphia. As a result of this achievement, Kel was selected as the Scout that would serve as Lord Baden-Powell’s Orderly when he came to visit Philadelphia.

Kel was inducted in the OA at its birthplace, Treasure Island, in 1918. He was one of the Council’s most decorated Scouts. By the time Kel was twenty-years old and attending the University of Pennsylvania he was an Eagle Scout with three Silver Palms (that would be at least 66 merit badges in 1924, a remarkable achievement in that era).

Syndicate content