Insignia

Insignia to Include BSA Protection

In 1976, in part to have trademark and proprietary protections, the Boy Scouts of America mandated that all patches be marked. The mark could take the form of writing, “BSA”, “Boy Scouts of America” or “Scouting /USA”. Alternatively a fleur-de-lis or trefoil could be used.

USA 200th Celebration

The American Bicentennial celebration in 1976 provided a focus for America to remember its history and celebrate its achievements, and the Boy Scouts used this historic event to promote Scouting’s values and contributions to American history. “Boypower ’76” was introduced in 1968, and through this National initiative, programs were introduced to Scout troops that allowed Scouts to earn special patches with Bicentennial emphasis as early as 1973.

National OA Committee Opposes Restrictions on Patches

A topic of great consternation in the 1960s and 70s was the matter of “restrictions” on OA badges. The term “restriction” references limits placed on Arrowmen regarding their ownership and usage of OA patches.

New OA Logo

In late 1975 the Order of the Arrow began usage of a new logo that replaced the original OA jacket patch that had been in use since 1967.  There was a need for a simpler design that could more easily be re-created by local lodges and would reproduce well on the black and white photocopiers in use at the time.

Jim Lovell

Jim Lovell is best known as the Commander of the Apollo 13 mission. He was also an Arrowman. Lovell was an Eagle Scout serving in Milwaukee County Council and in 1946 served as lodge treasurer of Mikano Lodge.

Lovell piloted the Gemini 7 space flight in December of 1965 and Gemini 12 in November of 1966. As Goodman put it,

we shot an Arrowman in the air.

First OA Jacket Patch Issued

Prior to 1967 the Order of the Arrow did not have a jacket patch. In fact, they really did not have a logo. They had of course used American Indian themes, but there was no standardized design. That all changed with the introduction of the first jacket patch featuring a multicolored American Indian chieftain. The design had been introduced circa 1961 and was used extensively starting at the 1961 NOAC.  The design is attributed to Martin Mockford.  The jacket patch was an immediate hit and became iconic in Scouting.

The OA in Space

On January 28, 1969 Donald Pountain, the lodge chief of Mikano Lodge, Milwaukee, Wisconsin received an astounding letter from a former lodge officer. Captain James “Jim” Lovell, former Lodge Secretary for Mikano Lodge had enclosed a Mikano Lodge flap that had joined Lovell on his Apollo 8 voyage that went around the moon and back. Lovell stated that he would have liked to have actually worn the patch on his spacesuit, however after the Apollo 1 tragedy, nothing could be worn on the suit that was not fireproof.

Pocket Flap Approved for Uniform Wear

It is strongly recommended by the National Committee that these emblems be made to fit the shape of the right shirt pocket flap. The right shirt pocket flap has been approved by the National Committee on Badges and Insignia for official Order of the Arrow Insignia where the other emblems are only temporary insignia when used on the uniform. It should be realized that this is a great advantage and a compliment to the Order of the Arrow.

Sashes Change From Felt to Twill

From the late teens until 1948, Grand Lodge / National Lodge issued sashes or bands were made of wool felt with wool felt arrows sewn onto the sash. Over the years because of a variety of manufacturers, the width of the sash and length of the sash varied. The same happened with the shape of the arrows sewn onto the sashes. The snaps also varied.

Evolution of Sashes

In the early ceremonies and Wimachtendienk literature arrow sashes were called arrow bands. The original band is the black sash used in the 1915 ceremonies on Treasure Island. Harry Yoder describes it as a black band with a white vertical stripe on the front. George Chapman described presumably the same band as being black with a white vertical arrow on the front with the arrow pointing over the shoulder. This band is the first sash and none are known to exist. The material used to make the sash is often described as being the same material that was used in the making of the black academic type robes worn by Goodman and Edson for the first ceremony.

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