Segregation

John Brown

John Brown grew up in the West Woodlawn community located on the South Side of the City of Chicago and has been a lifetime leader in the BSA. Brown grew up during the time when Chicago Council was segregated and as an African American he became part of Chicago’s segregated Douglas Division when he joined the Boy Scouts in 1945. Brown earned Eagle Scout in 1949 and became a member of Owasippe Lodge in 1950. He received his Brotherhood Honor in 1964 and kept his Vigil Honor in 1972. In 1994 Brown received the OA Distinguished Service Award (DSA). He received the Silver Antelope Award in 1999 and the Founders Award from Michigamea Lodge 110 in 2007.

An Arrowman's Profile - Desegregation of OA

Dr. David Briscoe grew up in Mars Hill, North Carolina, a small agrarian community 18 miles north of Asheville. He joined the Boy Scouts in 1965, earned Eagle Scout in 1968, and became a member of Tsali Lodge 134 in 1968. He was the first African American inductee and Vigil Honor member in that lodge which had existed for thirty years, at a time where segregation still dominated the South. He received Brotherhood in 1969, and the Vigil Honor in 1973. What follows is Dr. Briscoe’s Scout story as told in own words.

Emerson James

Emerson James was presumptively the first African American Vigil Honor member. He was from Woodlawn, located on the South Side of the City of Chicago.

Rule - Only One Lodge Per Camp

The Order of the Arrow’s local lodge organization was very different in 1923. The lodges were associated with their camp, not their council. Wimachtendienk after all was born a camp society. The greatest association with the council was through the Scout Executive who was the Supreme Chief of the Fire for each lodge in their council and could at his sole discretion terminate those lodges.

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