1

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/history/public_html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

National Bonnets

The original golden eagle feather bonnet worn and passed down by the national chiefs of the Order of the Arrow (OA) was made in 1938 by members of Anicus Lodge, East Boroughs Council located in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. Former Anicus Lodge Chief, Joseph A. Brunton, Jr. was the first chief to wear the bonnet. He had recently been elected chief of the National Lodge at the twelfth National Lodge Meeting hosted by Shawnee Lodge 51 at Irondale Scout Reservation located in Irondale, Missouri. Subsequently, Anicus Lodge presented this bonnet to the National Lodge of the Order of the Arrow in 1940 when they hosted the Order of the Arrow’s 25th Anniversary meeting at Camp Twin Echo, located near Ligonier, PA. Chief Brunton was the host council’s Scout Executive at the 25th Anniversary meeting and it was Brunton that ceremoniously passed the bonnet to the newly elected National Chief, George Mozealous of Owasippe Lodge. The ceremonious passing of the bonnet is a tradition that still continues to this day.

OA Becomes Official Scout Program

In 1933, the National Council (BSA) after methodical analysis concluded that programs like the OA could enhance Scouting. The OA had been assured that they would become an official Scout program.

Still to be sorted out were issues concerning the structure between the OA and BSA, methods of handling the Vigil Degree, issues regarding Arrowmen that no longer were registered as Scouts and adjustments desired by religious groups.

Changes in Terminology

As part of the agreement made by the OA National Executive Committee with the BSA to become an official part of the Boy Scout program the OA agreed to change certain terminology effective January 1, 1935 (although not disseminated to local lodges until April 23, 1935).

Formation National Executive Committee

Grand Chieftain Thomas Cairns authorized by the Grand Lodge at the 1933 meeting formed the Transition Committee to handle negotiations required for the Order to become an official BSA program. He renamed it the Grand Lodge Committee. This committee replaced the old Grand Council that was the executive board for the Grand Lodge. Cairns placed on the committee the Grand Lodge Officers, H. Lloyd Nelson, L. J. (Bert) Case and Joseph Pattison. Recognizing the need for the very best leadership to strategize, interface and negotiate with the BSA, Thomas Cairns consulted with E. Urner Goodman and appointed three more Arrowmen to the Committee – Alfred C. Nichols, Robert S. Henderson and Charles M. Heistand. Goodman was added to the committee as the National Council representative.

OA Becomes Official Experiment

 For the first 17 years of its existence, the Order had operated autonomously. While made up exclusively of Scouts the Order did not report to the national office. The one nod to the BSA authority was the Scout Executive, the Supreme Chief of the Fire, who possessed the authority to terminate the lodge.

Goodman - As Director of Program

By 1925 the BSA had outgrown its national and regional structure; each of more than 20 departments reported directly to Chief Scout Executive West. The national office reorganized in 1931, in four departments – Program, Operations, Personnel and Business.

50th Lodge Formed

Our Order chartered its fiftieth lodges on June 17, 1930 when Cherokee Lodge 50 of Birmingham, Alabama received its charter. After taking over eleven years for Wimachtendienk to grow to 25 lodges, the Order had doubled to fifty lodges in just over three and a half.

Goodman - First Director of Program

Goodman’s tenure as Scout Executive in Chicago ended, on April 1, 1931, E Urner Goodman became the first BSA Director of Program. Chief Scout Executive James E. West’s appointment followed Goodman's four year’s as Scout Executive in the nations largest council not directly overseen by the national office.

Goodman - Adult Family Life

Goodman matched his professional success during his years in Philadelphia with personal happiness. On June 18, 1920, he married Louise Wynkoop Waygood, a local girl whom he had first dated the same week in 1911 that he joined Troop 1. Louise and Urner had three children, Theodore Wynkoop, born August 12, 1921, George Walter, born February 26, 1923, and Lydia Ann, born April 21, 1927.

First Meeting of the Grand Lodge

In 1921 Wimachtendienk, W.W. (a common way at the time of referring to what we know as the Order of the Arrow) was ready to have a national structure. Patterned similar to the Freemasons, it was decided that each lodge would become a member of the Grand Lodge. On October 7 and 8, 1921, the first Grand Lodge Meeting hosted by the Philadelphia lodges, Unami and Unalachtigo was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and at their Camp Biddle. These meetings would later become known as National Meetings and are the distant predecessors of today’s NOACs.

Syndicate content