National OA Committee Chair

Ninth National OA Committee Chair

On September 1, 2009 former Vice Chairman of the National OA Committee Ray Capp became the Order’s ninth National OA Committee Chairman. Capp succeeded Brad Haddock who had served the Order for eight and a half years as the committee chair. Ray Capp was appointed to the National OA Committee in 2000.

Brad Haddock

The Order of the Arrow has been blessed by a small handful of transformational leaders that have taken a visionary position and inspired other Arrowmen to follow. The first such leader was E. Urner Goodman. It was Goodman that had the foresight to create and guide the Order at its genesis and during the early formative years. Then it was H. Lloyd Nelson who was the catalyst for innovation as he guided the Order into full integration with the BSA. Brad Haddock, like Goodman and Nelson before him, has been this type of transformational leader.

Sixth National OA Committee Chair

Tom McBride announced his intention to retire as the National OA Committee Chairman at the 1984 National Council Meeting. He stated that he was retiring because of his concern that new ideas and new leadership are critical for the continued success of the OrderPhoto of Thomas McBride.

George Feil Passes

Photo of George FeilOn May 26, 1985 the Order of the Arrow lost one of its greatest supporters and tireless leaders, George Feil. George Feil first joined the National OA Committee in 1955 and became Chairman in 1960. He served as Chairman for 18 years, longer than any other Chairman.

Fourth National OA Committee Chair

After five years of service, J.P. “Judge” Hunter resigned for health and business reasons as Chairman of the OA National Committee. In his place L. George Feil of Tamegonit Lodge, Kansas City, Kansas took over the helm.

George Feil & Son

The Feil family of Kansas City, Kansas served the Order of the Arrow for decades. The first member of the family to hold a leadership position was James R. (Jim) Feil. Jim, of Tamegonit Lodge. He was elected in 1953 to serve as National Conference Chief for the 1954 National Conference held in Laramie, Wyoming.

H. Lloyd Nelson Passes

On December 27, 1955, National OA Committee Chairman H. Lloyd Nelson passed away unexpectedly at the age of 52.

Nelson was living in Birmingham, Alabama when he suffered a fatal heart failure. All of the Order mourned.

First National OA Committee Chair

G. Kellock “Kel” Hale was installed as the first Chairman of the National Order of the Arrow Committee at the 1948 National Conference at Bloomington, Indiana. The National Council, BSA, had not technically approved his position yet, but that was just a formality. The selection of Hale according to outgoing National Chief Robert Heistand was because Kel was next in line to be National Chief. The new National Chairman position was considered the post-BSA integration equivalent to the old National Chief.

G. Kellock Hale, Jr.

G. Kellock “Kel” Hale was born January 17, 1904 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He joined Scouts at the age of 12 (minimum age in those days) in 1916. During World War I, Kel sold more war bonds than any other Scout in Philadelphia. As a result of this achievement, Kel was selected as the Scout that would serve as Lord Baden-Powell’s Orderly when he came to visit Philadelphia.

Kel was inducted in the OA at its birthplace, Treasure Island, in 1918. He was one of the Council’s most decorated Scouts. By the time Kel was twenty-years old and attending the University of Pennsylvania he was an Eagle Scout with three Silver Palms (that would be at least 66 merit badges in 1924, a remarkable achievement in that era).

Second National OA Committee Chair

In December of 1949 the President of the BSA appointed H. Lloyd Nelson Chairman of the National Order of the Arrow Committee. G. Kellock Hale Jr. reluctantly submitted his resignation after only one year under doctor’s orders to give up all activities and have complete rest.

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