National Meeting

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First "National" Lodge Meeting

The OA gathered together again for a national meeting hosted for a fourth time by Unami Lodge at Treasure Island. The convention had originally been scheduled for 1935, as meetings were biannual. However, the workload created by the planned 1935 National Jamboree impacted the national officers and many leaders of the local lodges. It was decided to delay the meeting for a year. This pattern has been repeated in later years, the Order giving deference to the National Jamboree, even if it meant a three-year gap between NOAC’s instead of two.


The 1936 meeting was one of change. It no longer was a “Grand” Lodge Meeting. This was a “National” Lodge Meeting. The change in name a simple reminder of the change in the Order, now part of the BSA. The change in the program, however, was striking.

Third Degree / Vigil Honor OA Sashes

The first example of anything resembling a sash worn by recipients of the Third Degree (Vigil Honor) is a fraternal “bib” type three-part sash. These sashes can be observed around the necks of founders E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson in the photograph taken at the Rededication Ceremony held at Camp Biddle in conjunction with the first Grand Lodge Meeting in 1921. Other than the photograph itself, there is no other evidence, documentation or even confirmation that these are indeed Third Degree sashes.

First Meeting of the Grand Lodge

In 1921 Wimachtendienk, W.W. (a common way at the time of referring to what we know as the Order of the Arrow) was ready to have a national structure. Patterned similar to the Freemasons, it was decided that each lodge would become a member of the Grand Lodge. On October 7 and 8, 1921, the first Grand Lodge Meeting hosted by the Philadelphia lodges, Unami and Unalachtigo was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and at their Camp Biddle. These meetings would later become known as National Meetings and are the distant predecessors of today’s NOACs.

Constitution for WWW

One of the primary purposes of the first meeting of the Grand Lodge in 1921 was to frame and ratify the first WWW national constitution.

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